Category Archives: 1940s

Anna Karenina (1948)

Vivien Leigh takes over the epic title role of Anna Karenina as one of her greatest performances.  Continue reading Anna Karenina (1948)

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The Heiress (1949)

Oh what an awesome girl power movie that was. It starts with Catherine, a terribly shy but very rich girl with an asshole of a father. She meets Morris, who proposes to her rather quickly, and her father is convinced that he only wants her for her finances. Catherine and Morris decide to elope, but only before Morris discovers that if her father doesn’t approve of her marriage, she will not receive the money that she is due to inherit. Morris leaves her broken hearted after discovering that this money will not be his to use. (Pride and Prejudice much, Mr. Wickham?)

Years later, after her father dies, Morris returns and attempts for her heart once again. Catherine, who is far more clever now, realizes that his intentions have not changed. She agrees to marry him, but as he knocks on her door, packed for elopement, she bolts the door and leaves him abandoned on the front steps. It turns out that she gets the last laugh.

The Heiress was a really good film, quite an improvement from the lull I’ve been in with one western or film noir after another. I needed a little bit of a break from those.

Four stars!

The Heiress (1949)

The Pirate (1948)

Is this meant to be satirical? If it is, then it’s doing a great job at it. If its not, well, this movie is ridiculous. My assumption is that it would be satirical, only since I’m not one hundred percent sure, it knocks a couple points off for me.

I love Judy Garland and Gene Kelly, so this experience is not half bad. However, Judy’s character annoys me. She has very little to say other than the fact that she wants to travel. Yet when someone new comes along, she treats his company has an unforgivable sin. I’m a bit confused.

It’s chinsy, it’s romantic, it’s absurd. Three stars?

The Pirate (1948)

The Red Shoes (1948)

The plot, the characters, the lighting, the cinematography, none of them matter. The dancing was exquisite. Though I didn’t fall in love with Vicky Page, nor Moira Shearer for that matter, I appreciated the film for what it was. The costumes were incandescent.

I’m a bit confused about the ending, however. Did the red shoes force her to jump off the balcony, or did she feel so helpless that the two loves of her life cannot make room for each other that she jumped willingly? Did the director of the ballet even feel guilt?

But alas, I’ll give it four stars.

The Red Shoes (1948)

Miracle on 34th Street (1947)

In light of the upcoming holiday season, I finally watched this enchantingly wonderful christmas movie. Natalie Wood plays the daughter, and she’s so young! My favorite christmas movie will always be White Christmas (or Love Actually, OR The Santa Clause but that breaks the theme I’m going for here), but this was quite delightful.

Thanksgiving is coming up this week, so I probably won’t be posting much after I go home on Tuesday. But come Friday, I can finally be open with the fact that I’ve been secretly celebrating Christmas for about three weeks already!

This is definitely a classic film staple, five stars!

Miracle on 34th Street (1947)